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    Amazing Homes » Steps in Heritage renovations
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    Key steps in a heritage renovation

    Knowing where to start can really prevent time and budgets blowouts in the building and renovation process.  If you are yet to approach an architect or draftsman we can refer you to highly skilled designers we’ve worked with and show you examples of what we’ve achieved together in the past. If you’re already in talks with a designer, or about to approach one, then ensure you have following information to ensure plans are possible and time frames are meet.

    FIND YOUR PROPERTIES ZONE

    Every property falls into area classification zones and each zone has different rules about what you can do with your property.  When planning your property renovation, check out your zone first to see if any of your ideas won’t be permitted.

    FIND OUT YOUR LOT SIZE

    Smaller lots or ground space have different planning and developing rules so ensure you check if your property size is deemed smaller than standard as you will need to consider this in the planning phase.

    ARE YOU IN A DEMOLITION CONTROL PRECINCT

    Demolition Control Precincts are scattered across Brisbane protecting areas with houses that were built prior to 1947.  These are often referred to as character homes.  Approval to demolish or renovate homes in these areas, must be sought.

    CHECK IF YOUR HERITAGE LISTED

    The City Plans and State Government’s Heritage Register have similar criteria and both need to be checked if your property is heritage listed. Heritage listed properties are protected and any renovation or development plans need to be approved before building.  These approvals are separate to building approvals.

    CHECK THE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

    Neighbourhood plans are a tool to manage changes within Brisbane’s suburbs, accommodate growth and better protect valued environments at a local level. Some Neighbourhood Plans contain extra rules about new development and these rules need to be sought out prior to planning submissions.

    CHECK OTHER DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINTS

    If your property has other development constraints such as a waterway corridor, a patch of native bushland or an overland water flow path, specific developmental plans will need to be in place to accommodate these.